Pics from the Office - The Book

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Jun 13, 2016

Sharklets!

A320 CS-TNS during the turn-around in Sal (Cape Verde). This chartered flight from Porto and back was my first chance to experience one of TAP's few Sharklet retrofitted A320's. Besides increasing fuel efficency by reducing wing tip vortice induced drag, the Sharklets also make the airplane look a whole lot better which, I guess, is always a commercial advantage. The C-17 in the back also has wingtip extentions which serve the same purpose. Those are, however, called winglets instead of Sharklets which is an Airbus trademark.

Outside In


Apr 30, 2016

City of Lights

An amazing view of Paris from FL360 shortly before starting the descent towards Luxembourg in Airbus A319 CS-TTC. Can you spot the Eiffel tower?

Crepuscular Radiation

Spectacular crepescular rays shooting through the broken Stratocumulus clouds over Munich's airport. Airbus A319 CS-TTG on a long final for runway 26L

Ice Vortex I

What do you get when you put a cold atmosphere, jet engines and a heavy Boeing 747-8 together? This! A violently twisting and turning contrail. As the water vapor produced in the engines combustion chambers meets the cold atmosphere, it instantly condenses into water droplets (if its cold enough, the vapor will change directly into ice crystals in a process called deposition) thereby creating a contrail (condensation trail). As the contrail meets the powerful but invisible wingtip vortices of a Lufthansa Boeing 747-8, it makes them visible and the result is amazing. From Porto to Paris Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTH looking out for wake turbulence.

Ice Vortex II

What do you get when you put a cold atmosphere, jet engines and a heavy Boeing 747-8 together? This! A violently twisting and turning contrail. As the water vapor produced in the engines combustion chambers meets the cold atmosphere, it instantly condenses into water droplets (if its cold enough, the vapor will change directly into ice crystals in a process called deposition) thereby creating a contrail (condensation trail). As the contrail meets the powerful but invisible wingtip vortices of a Lufthansa Boeing 747-8, it makes them visible and the result is amazing. From Porto to Paris Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTH looking out for wake turbulence.

Jan 7, 2016

Crack of Dusk

The setting Sun escapes between cloud layers shortly before the approach and landing at Porto inbound from Zurich in Airbus A319 CS-TTQ.

Cross Jet

Much like a migrating bird, the subtropical jetstream moves south in the winter thereby affecting the portuguese latitudes. It also intensifies in strength and is often accompanied by moderate clear air turbulence (CAT). Here, the powerful jetstream calls for an almost 20ยบ drift correction in order to fly the required track to LIDRO waypoint where the standard arrival to our destination begins. With a true airspeed (TAS) of 416 kts, a drift correction of this magnitude requires a serious crosswind which in this case blows at 146 kts. Airbus A319 CS-TTN from Lisbon to Funchal at FL330.

Jan 1, 2016

Crossing Traffic


High altitude crossing in the early morning while flying from Porto to Paris - Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTQ.

Barcelona by Night

Night falls on Barcelona seen off the nose of Airbus A319 CS-TTG enroute from Venice to Lisbon.

Filtered Sunlight

An awsome December sunrise greets us in the climb out of Porto towards Paris - Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTN.

Local Instability

Hot industrial smoke pierces the overcast and rises in the cold morning air as we descend towards Paris in Airbus A319 CS-TTN. High atmospheric pressures have materialized low visibility weather conditions and we are set up for a CAT III B approach in Orly.

Jun 23, 2015

Organized Chaos

Three crossing traffics, each separated by 2000ft, shoot by as we navigate in the opposite direction. This is RVSM (Reduced Vertical Separation Minima) airspace which means that we will have a minimum vertical separation of 1000ft (about 300m) with the aircraft passing above and below us. This allows for more airplanes in the same airspace but before operating here, several strict requirements need to be met. A319 CS-TTU from Porto to Zurich.

Cloud Monsters

The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability creates some late afternoon "cloud monsters" as we cruise by in A320 CS-TNU from London-Gatwick to Porto.

Jan 18, 2015

The Glory of the A321 Pilot

The shadow of Airbus A321 CS-TJG in the climb out of Funchal with 199 Lisbon bound passengers on board.

Dec 24, 2014

Gateway

Not much of a photograph, but interesting nevertheless. Dense fog engulfs Paris Orly where low visibility procedures are enforced due to an RVR (Runway Visual Range) of 275m. We are performing a CAT III B ILS approach to runway 26 with a regulatory DH (decision height) of 20ft. This shot reveals where the fog is disrupted by engine exhaust and wake turbulence from the aircraft on the glidepath and effectively making visible an otherwise invisible ILS.

Dec 10, 2014

Solar Fan

Ignited by the setting Sun on A319 CS-TTR's tail, the CFM56-5B fan blades glow as if they marked the entrance to a blast furnace. This shot clearly reveals the high by-pass nature of the engine in which only a small portion of the air that goes through the fan disk, about 1/6th , has access to the engine core via the low pressure compressor. The rest of the air remains cold and is shot out of the rear of the engine by the fan producing the vast majority of total thrust.

Nov 26, 2014

The Book

Pics from the Office has proudly evolved into a bilingual (English-Portuguese) book made from a selection of some of the blog’s best photographs along with improved text explanations. The book offers altogether good value-for-money and is available online as well as in most Portuguese book stores. For orders and information visit www.facebook.com/picsfromtheoffice or e-mail  mathieuneuforge@hotmail.com

Nov 13, 2014

Trail Blazing

As a byproduct of the combustion process, hot water vapor (steam) is expelled into the cold upper atmosphere by the engines. If the temperature is low enough, the vapor instantly condenses then freezes into ice crystals. In this shot, the water molecules seem to cry for attention in the short period between the engine exhaust and evaporating back into invisible vapor. Flying from Zurich to Lisbon in A320 CS-TQD.

Porto Squall

A powerful Cumulonimbus releases its fury as it plows through the vicinity of Porto and its airport. A close lookout is kept  for early indications of windshear as we establish on the ILS for runway 17 in A319 CS-TTK inbound from Paris Orly.

Mushroom Cloud

This spacecraft or mushroom looking Alto Cumulus cloud releases a shower as we cruise by in A319 CS-TTU from Vienna to Lisbon. The precipitation, which evaporates long before reaching the ground, is called virga.

Back Light

A solitary cumulus, backlit by the Sun over the coast of northern Spain, dissipates as our flight progresses from Porto to Geneva in A319 CS-TTG.

Air Lines

A persistent contrail lingers in the cold upper atmosphere as it merges into its shadow at the horizon. Our own contrail's projection can be seen at the bottom of the photo as it is being created in the cruise from Porto to Paris Orly in A319 CS-TTE.

Jul 21, 2014

Perfect Departure

Airbus A319 CS-TTR lined-up on Porto's runway 35. This time, an encounter with just the right light and "cloud-scape" created this painting-like cenario. After a quick mental review of engine-out procedures, we're off for yet another departure bound to London Gatwick.

Sun Flare

The Sun has dropped behind the western horizon but its blazing effect persists among the high altitude cirro-stratus clouds as we cruise from Porto to Paris Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTQ.

Distant Thunder

A distant Cumulonimbus is highlighted by the ever familiar and always amazing colors of the setting Sun as we track from Geneva to Porto in Airbus A319 CS-TTL. Cumulonimbus clouds are the only ones able to generate lightning and hail. They feed essentially on heat and moisture. The one in this pic has reached maturity and is now in its dissipation stage.

Rerouted

A tell-tale condesation trail reveals the routing of an above traffic as we cruise from Porto to Paris Orly in Airbus A319 CS-TTE.

Nov 2, 2013

Last Light


Posted by Picasa Amazing display of light shortly before diving into the clouds and establishing on the ILS approach for Porto's runway 17. A319 CS-TTP arriving from Zurich.

Trailing Condensation


Posted by Picasa A Boeing 737 overhead is leaving a persistent condenstion trail across the Spanish airspace as we head West from Zurich to Porto in A319 CS-TTP. 

Sep 28, 2013

Pyrocumulus Genisis

Posted by Picasa

Incandescent Spectacle


Posted by Picasa Defining spectacle: "A visually striking performance or display". There you have it while flying from Paris Orly to Porto in A319 CS-TTB.

Pileus


Posted by Picasa Pileus, also known as "cap cloud" sometimes form around fast growing Cumulus clouds due to the uplifting and consequent cooling of the surrounding air. This one was pictured inflight from Zurich to Porto in A320 CS-TNS.

Sep 5, 2013

Increasing Headings


Posted by Picasa The attitude indicator, also known as the artificial horizon tells the pilot about aircraft pitch attitude and bank angle. In a turn it seems to tilt or bank to the opposite side of the turn but actually it doesn't tilt at all; obviously, it's the aircraft that tilts around it. This shot of the standby attitude indicator highlights just that. A319 CS-TTG from Porto to Paris Orly.

Dog As...


Posted by Picasa The NOTOC (NOtification TO Captain) is a document intended to notify a Captain of any special and/or dangerous cargo to be loaded onto the aircraft. In this case A320 CS-TNP from Porto to Geneva. It's usually a quite clear and straight forward document however here is a NOTOC referring to four live animals (AVI's) which, I have to say, am still not sure about...

Floating Clouds


Posted by Picasa The agitated waters of the Cantabrian Sea along with its windswept clouds come to a momentary halt as the Sun escapes over the western horizon and lonesome observers cruise overhead in A319 CS-TTH enroute from Porto to Paris Orly. For a moment, the illusion of calm prevails, the clouds seem to float and the smooth surface mirror their presence until once again the agitated waters take over.

Hot Pavement


Posted by Picasa Lined up and ready to go on London Gatwick's runway 26L in A320 CS-TNG. This is one busy strip of pavement where arriving and departing aircraft are efficiently coordinated so as to operate at a maximum of 55 movements per hour. Despite having two parallel runways, only one is used at a time making LGW the busiest single runway airport in the world and in this pic, it's all ours as we head to Porto.

Aug 11, 2013

MEL Dispatch


Posted by Picasa Modern airplanes are complex machines with a multitude of systems and sub-systems. Occasionally failures will occur and the MEL (Minimum Equipment List) must be referred to in order to determine if the flight may be dispatched with the failed system and if so, which additional or alternative procedures must be carried out. Here, one of the three inertial reference units is failed and the flight has been dispatched in accordance with the MEL. A319 CS-TTJ from Lajes (Azores) to Lisbon.